skill content of recent technological change
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skill content of recent technological change an empirical exploration by David H. Autor

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Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Computer literacy.,
  • Skilled labor.,
  • Labor demand.,
  • Technological innovations.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementDavid H. Autor, Frank Levy, Richard J. Murnane.
SeriesNBER working paper series -- no. 8337, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 8337.
ContributionsLevy, Frank, 1941-, Murnane, Richard J., National Bureau of Economic Research.
The Physical Object
Pagination39, [19] p. :
Number of Pages39
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22423427M

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The Skill Content of Recent Technological Change: An Empirical Exploration David H. Autor, Frank Levy, Richard J. Murnane. NBER Working Paper No. Issued in June NBER Program(s):Labor Studies, Productivity, Innovation, and EntrepreneurshipCited by: The Skill Content Of Recent Technological Change: An Empirical Exploration. A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors).   The skill content of recent technological change: an empirical exploration by Autor, David H; Levy, Frank, ; Murnane, Richard J; Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Pages: "The skill content of recent technological change: an empirical exploration," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Nov. David H. Autor & Frank Levy & Richard J. Murnane, " The Skill Content of Recent Technological Change: An Empirical Exploration," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. (4), pages

Introduction Muchquantitativeandcase-studyevidencedocumentsastrongassociationbetweentheadoptionof computersandcomputer-basedtechnologiesandtheincreaseduseofcollege. The Skill Content Of Recent Technological Change: An Empirical Exploration. and Richard J. Murnane. Abstract. We apply an understanding of what computers do to study how computerization alters job skill demands. We argue that computer capital (1) substitutes for workers in performing cognitive and manual tasks that can be accomplished by.   Abstract. We apply an understanding of what computers do to study how computerization alters job skill demands. We argue that computer capital (1) substitutes for workers in performing cognitive and manual tasks that can be accomplished by following explicit rules; and (2) complements workers in performing nonroutine problem-solving and complex communications by:   The Skill Content of Recent Technological Change: An Empirical Exploration MIT Dept. of Economics Working Paper No. Number of pages: 60 Posted: 08 Jun Cited by:

recent technological change skill content preliminary comment empirical exploration occupation requirement human activity computer capital substitute manual skill occupational distribution increased use well-defined set repetitive information processing demand shift workplace skill first approximation widespread adoption cognitive skill simple. skill content recent technological change empirical exploration occupational title variable workplace skill demand human activity computer capital second set imperfect substitute manual skill increased use task framework implies measurable change task content occupation requirement well-defined set manual task individual characteristic. The skill content of recent technological change: an empirical exploration. Abstract: We apply an understanding of what computers do -- the execution of procedural or rules-based logic -- to study how computer technology alters job skill demands. The Skill Content of Recent Technological Change: An Empirical Exploration. Recent empirical and case study evidence documents a strong association between the adoption of computers and increased use of college educated or non-production workers. With few exceptions, the conceptual link explaining how computer technology complements.